Are You Curious Of The Scariest Jobs In The World

People are always saying “do what you love and love what you do”, but very few people on this list probably follow that. Either way, if there’s a job, there’s almost always someone willing to do it. Sometimes it’s out of necessity, but there’s also a bunch of people who just like pissing their pants on a regular basis.
Here are some of the scariest jobs in the world!
5. Steeplejack
Chruch spires, cathedral domes, industrial chimneys, towering skyscrapers – all remarkable feats of human engineering, and all in need of repair at some time in their lives. That’s where Steeplejacks come in. Their job is to build and repair tall structures, which means they normally spend their days scaling, clinging to and hovering above some pretty terrifying drops. I think it’s fair to say “a head for heights” would be useful in this job!
4. High-Rise Window Washer
For an average annual salary of a $28K and the imminent possibility of gruesome death, you too can have the pleasure of zipping from window pane to window pane to clean the nation’s high-rise buildings. But hey! If you don’t die on the job you’ll be privy to everyone’s business working in the office!
All jokes aside, high-rise window washers need training (and usually a certificate) before they’re allowed to work at heights, use power-operated access equipment, scaffolding and abseiling techniques. It’s a heavily regulated industry – washers must assess every job before they begin and create an emergency rescue plan – but serious and sometimes fatal accidents still happen from time to time.
3. Miner
Mining is one of the world’soldest industries, and has a long and contentious history to prove it. This job is not for the faint-hearted and claustrophobics need not apply! Miners spend long hours confined in tight spaces, working in poor light. But while there’s good money to be made from it, the job comes with significant risk.
We all remember the happy ending to the Chilean mining disaster of 2010, but positive outcomes like this are rare. Over 12,000 mining deaths are recorded each year, with many more thought to go unrecorded. Common mining hazards include cave-ins, gas explosions, vehicle or equipment crushings, chemical leaks and electrocution, all down mines that can be as deep as 3.9km. Oh, and Miners also have significantly shorter life expectancies due to prolonged exposure to industrial air pollution…
2. Rodeo Clown
They may look likes clowns but this job is no laughing matter! Rodeo clowns aren’t just there for audiences to laugh at while stuffing their faces with hot dogs and popcorn; their actual job is to distract the bull once he’s emerged from the bucking chute. Working in teams, rodeo clowns shout, provoke and throw hats so fallen bull riders can safely escape the ring. Essentially, Rodeo Clowns are bullfighters with make up on! Average rodeo clowns make anywhere between $100 and $500 a job; however, the most skilled and experienced clowns make six figures a year. Not bad if you don’t mind locking yourself in an open pit with a raging bull…
1. Alaskan Crab Fisherman
According to a recent survey by the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Alaskan crab fishing is the most dangerous job in the United States. Because of the harsh environment and the fishing methods used, mortality rates in this role are 26 times higher (80%) than that of the average worker. Yes, unlikely as it seems, Alaskan Crab Fisherman is consistently voted among the most dangerous professions in the world.
Even successful voyages aren’t pleasant: these fishermen live in cramped quarters for weeks at a time, go days without showering, and regularly work 48 straight hours in freezing conditions hauling up nets or cages weighing several hundred pounds. Add pelting rain, rogue waves and icy decks into the mix and the work becomes lethal! These fishermen are at the mercy of unpredictable weather and ocean conditions and, thanks to the state’s geographical location, Alaskan waters are colder and less forgiving than most other fishing environments.
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