The most dangerous bugs in the world you should stay away from

Did you know one of the most common phobias in the world is creepy crawlies? That’s right, those tiny little critters seem to cause more fear in us than almost anything else, even though the invention of the slipper and the rolled up newspaper has definitely given us an advantage when it comes to splattering them. Some bugs, however, deserve our fear. From a bug that is probably hiding in your house at this very moment, to a spider with the most original name ever, here are the 20 Deadliest Bugs in the World.

Violin Beetle

Violin Beetle

Mormolyce phyllodes, commonly known as the violin beetle, is a species of ground beetles in the subfamily Lebiinae
Mormolyce phyllodes can reach a length of 60–100 millimetres (2.4–3.9 in).[4] These beetles possess a flat leaf-shaped, shiny black or brown body with distinctive violin-shaped translucent elytra (hence the common name). This characteristic mimicry protects them against predators, while their flat shaped body allow them to dwell in soil cracks or under the bark and leaves of trees. Head and pronotum are very elongated, with long antennae and the legs are long and slender.
Both adults and larvae are predators, feeding on insect larvae. For defense purposes, they secrete the poisonous butyric acid.The larvae live between layers of bracket fungi, genus Polyporus. Their development lasts 8–9 months, while pupation lasts 8–10 weeks. Adults fly from August to November.

Wax Tailed

Wax Tailed

Wax-tail hoppers belong to the family Fulgoridae, and are distant relatives of cicadas and treehoppers. Like their cousins they also feed on plant juices (floem mostly), extracted through their long, siringe-like mouthparts. Plant juices are rich in carbohydrates, and wax-tails convert them into ketoester waxes, which are used to produce long, feather-like plumes. Their main function appears to be mostly defensive, both against large predators, who are likely to end up with a mouthful of wax rather than a tasty insect, and against small parasitoid insects. Females also use the wax to cover their egg clutches to protect them from parasitoids and desiccation.
After the female had finished laying her eggs, I moved her, very gently as not to break off her “tail”, onto the white background of my portable field studio. Incidentally, if you ever need to photograph a white or translucent insect, place one of the lights above the insect and only slightly behind. If the light is directly behind then the white elements of its body will not show very well or disappear completely.

Brazilian Treehopper

Brazilian Treehopper

Members of the genus Bocydium are found only in the northern half of South America. The various species range from 4.6 to 7.5 mm in length (Godoy et al., 2006).
The purpose of the balls on the pronotal extensions has not been definitively explained.
Bocydium globulare is a solitary species. These hoppers are most often found feeding on the undersides of Glory Bush leaves (Miconia spp.) a couple of meters above the forest floor. The species is also attracted to lights.
Salvador Dali came up with some lovely surreal forms in his art, but this thing blows them all out of the water. Seen in Berlin’s Museum of Natural History, this is the Brazilian Treehopper, or Bocydium globulare – a real living insect, which only pretends to be an alien helicopter:

In the video below, you can see Dea.dliest Bugs In The World If you See, It Stay Away!
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Video resource : The Fancy Banana

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